Copyright © 2019  Lung Cancer Network Malaysia.  All rights reserved.
Lung Cancer Network Malaysia
(Persatuan Jaringan Kanser Paru-Paru Malaysia)
PPM-018-14-04042019
 
Molecular Testing for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Malaysia: Consensus Statement from the College of Pathologists, Academy of Medicine Malaysia, the Malaysian Thoracic Society, and the Malaysian Oncological Society.

Abstract

In the recent years, increased understanding of the molecular profiles of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has allowed for targeted treatment of actionable genetic mutations. The management of NSCLC now requires multiple molecular tests to guide the treatment strategy. In the light of this, there is a need to establish a molecular testing consensus statement for advanced NSCLC patients in Malaysia. This Malaysian consensus statement was developed by a panel of experts, chaired by a pathologist and composed of three other pathologists, four respiratory physicians and three oncologists. It reflects currently available scientific data and adaptations of recommendations from international guidelines to the local landscape. Expert recommendations on different aspects of molecular testing agreed upon by the panel are provided as structured discussions. These recommendations address the appropriate patients and samples to be tested, as well as when and how these tests should be performed. The algorithms for molecular testing in metastatic NSCLC, in the first line setting and upon disease progression beyond first line therapy, were developed.

Read more at DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2019.08.005
NELSON Study: CT Screening for Early Lung Cancer Reduces Lung Cancer Mortality
By The ASCO Post

Findings from the NELSON study demonstrate that the use of computed tomography (CT) screening among asymptomatic men at high risk for lung cancer led to a 26% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9%-41%) reduction in lung cancer deaths at 10 years of study follow-up (at 86% compliance). In the smaller subset of women, the rate-ratio of dying from lung cancer varied between 0.39 and 0.61 in different years of follow-up, indicating a significant and even larger reduction in lung cancer mortality than in men. Harry J. De Koning, MD, PhD, of Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands, presented these findings at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer (Abstract PL02.05).

Read more: WCLC 2018: Press Program Press Release De Koning 9.25 FINAL
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